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WaterWise - Smart Solutions from CU Water Tips
Efficiency is for everyone. We all know energy and water efficiency are keys to a better and brighter future.

Learning more about how to reduce your energy and water usage gives you the power to conserve for our community, and save money on your utility bills.

Tips to Save Water

Water is one of our most precious natural resources, and everyone in our community should be doing their best to conserve water all the time. If each of us can do just one thing each day to save water - even if it’s only a couple of gallons - our community can save more than a million gallons of water each week. The following are no-cost and low-cost ways to reduce water usage in and around your home.

Savings Tips
Indoors

When you save water, you save money on your utility bills too.
  • If possible, replace toilets built before 1994; they use 3 1/2 gallons or more per flush, while newer WaterSense® labeled models use only 1.28 gallons or less per flush.
  • Listen for dripping faucets and running toilets. Small leaks can add up in a hurry. Check for leaky toilets by dropping a little food coloring in your toilet tank; if, without flushing, the color appears in the bowl, you have a leak. Fortunately, the flapper and fill valve are easy, inexpensive replacements. Click here to learn more about locating water leaks.
  • Turn off the water while shaving can save up to 300 gallons a month. Turn off the water while washing your hair can save up to 150 gallons per month.
  • Run the clothes washer and dishwasher only when they are full.
  • If your shower fills a 1 gallon bucket in less than 20 seconds, install a water-saving 2.0 gpm low-flow showerhead.
  • Replace the aerators on faucets with new efficient models rated 1.5 gallons or less per minute.
  • Take shorter showers. 5 minutes or less will add up to big savings.
  • When taking a bath, plug the bathtub before turning the water on and then adjust the temperature as the tub fills.
  • Keep a pitcher of drinking water in the refrigerator to avoid the wasteful habit of running tap water to cool it for drinking.
  • Wash your fruits and vegetables in a pan of water instead of under a running faucet. You can then re-use the water for plants.

Outdoors

Remember, most lawns in southwest Missouri only require 1 to 1 1/2 inches of water per week.
  • Inspect your lawn irrigation system, outside faucets, hoses and drip sprayers, and fix leaks immediately. Small leaks can add up to high water bills quickly. Click here to learn more about locating water leaks.
  • Participate in the CU Even/Odd Watering Program. You can help Springfield save water and you will save money. For details about this program, visit our Odd/Even Watering page.
  • Water your lawn and garden early in the morning or evening when temperatures are cooler and to help avoid evaporation. Only water when the wind is calm, so the water falls where you want.
  • Adjust sprinklers so only the lawn is watered, not the sidewalk, house or street. If you see excess water running into the street, move the sprinkler or have the heads adjusted on irrigation systems.
  • Place mulch around trees and plants retain water longer and to slow evaporation.
  • Install a rain sensor on your irrigation system to avoid watering your lawn during or immediately after rain.
  • Don't run the hose while washing your car; use a bucket of water and a quick hose rinse at the end.
  • Use a broom instead of a hose to clean driveways and sidewalks.
  • Learn how to shut off your irrigation system in case of leaks, malfunctions, or unexpected rains.
  • Direct downspouts and other runoff toward shrubs and trees, or collect and use for plants.
  • Choose shrubs and groundcover plants that have greater heat and drought tolerances and require less water.

Making simple adjustments to our water usage will result in significant savings. Remember, if each of our 80,000 residential and business customers saved just two gallons of water each day, that’s more than 1,000,000 gallons a week. Now imagine what we could save if everyone would participate in water conservation.